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Ticket Sales Report

Ticket Sales Research

LIVE, (the music trade body) working with Chris Carey at OPINIUM, have recently conducted research and produced a comprehensive statement on issues connected to ticket buying.  The full report can be viewed here.

In short, the data around festivals contained within this survey is slightly less encouraging than one-off gigs, but with the festival season yet fully to take place in the UK the similarity between pre- and post- pandemic numbers is actually quite encouraging.  For instance, small festivals i.e., less than 5000 people are slow sales but gradually pick up as they get nearer to the event, i.e., late booking.  Larger festivals over 5000 are about the same.

Over half of UK adult attendees at festivals report that their attitude to attending has changed since before the pandemic.  The top change in attitude includes going to less events (20%), not having as much energy to go out and not thinking about going out to live music (15%), and for over 1 in 10 (13%) travelling to events now feels like a lot of effort.  Of those who attended live music events 3 in ten (31%) feel that tickets are far too expensive.

As organisers we must assume that by ‘far too expensive’ they mean in the current climate and set against their overall budget, because as we know ticket sales for festivals are pound for pound extremely good value and not actually very expensive.  In 2023 due to the ever-increasing costs of staging festivals, it is very likely that the £200 adult season ticket will be quite common.

Feelings reported towards buying tickets for festivals – 24% have less disposal income.  23% everything is more expensive post-pandemic.  16% won’t buy if there is no guaranteed refund if the show is postponed.  14% live music feels more expensive compared to other forms of entertainment.  11% say they are buying some tickets but going to less events overall.

For those of you who completed the survey and helped towards these results, thank you.  The figures are very valuable in our ongoing campaigns for support for the Arts.  And thanks to Chris Carey for undertaking the work and including us in the survey.

LIVE, (the music trade body) working with Chris Carey at OPINIUM, have recently conducted research and produced a comprehensive statement on issues connected to ticket buying.  The full report can be viewed here.

 In short, the data around festivals contained within this survey is slightly less encouraging than one-off gigs, but with the festival season yet fully to take place in the UK the similarity between pre- and post- pandemic numbers is actually quite encouraging.  For instance, small festivals i.e., less than 5000 people are slow sales but gradually pick up as they get nearer to the event, i.e., late booking.  Larger festivals over 5000 are about the same.

 Over half of UK adult attendees at festivals report that their attitude to attending has changed since before the pandemic.  The top change in attitude includes going to less events (20%), not having as much energy to go out and not thinking about going out to live music (15%), and for over 1 in 10 (13%) travelling to events now feels like a lot of effort.  Of those who attended live music events 3 in ten (31%) feel that tickets are far too expensive.

 As organisers we must assume that by ‘far too expensive’ they mean in the current climate and set against their overall budget, because as we know ticket sales for festivals are pound for pound extremely good value and not actually very expensive.  In 2023 due to the ever-increasing costs of staging festivals, it is very likely that the £200 adult season ticket will be quite common.

 Feelings reported towards buying tickets for festivals – 24% have less disposal income.  23% everything is more expensive post-pandemic.  16% won’t buy if there is no guaranteed refund if the show is postponed.  14% live music feels more expensive compared to other forms of entertainment.  11% say they are buying some tickets but going to less events overall.

 For those of you who completed the survey and helped towards these results, thank you.  The figures are very valuable in our ongoing campaigns for support for the Arts.  And thanks to Chris Carey for undertaking the work and including us in the survey.

 

 

Association of Festival Organisers (AFO): 6th Jul 2022 15:48:00

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